Part I – Initial Report to the House of Commons (February 14, 2013) – Ontario – Reasoning and Outcome by Region

Northern Ontario

According to the 2011 Census, the population of Northern Ontario is 832,014, a slight decrease from the 2001 Census. Northern Ontario occupies a land mass that is 87.77% of the total area of the province. The region currently has 10 electoral districts. If the provincial quota were strictly applied, it would have only eight.

During public hearings conducted in Northern Ontario, the Commission received submissions urging it to establish a separate population quota for that region in order to preserve a minimum of 10 electoral districts. As noted in its Proposal, although the Commission is independent, it is nevertheless governed by the provisions of the Act and is not entitled to ignore those provisions. The Commission is of the view that it does not have jurisdiction to establish a lower population quota for Northern Ontario, and that any changes to the legislation in that regard are matters for Parliament to determine.

The Commission did decide to exercise its discretion to respect the key principle of effective electoral representation. Given its vast geographic size, the Commission believes that Northern Ontario requires a minimum of 10 electoral districts in order for citizens of the region to have effective representation. This decision is consistent with the provisions of the Act that permit the Commission to look beyond the provincial quota and consider manageable geographic size for sparsely populated, rural or northern regions.

The Act permits deviation beyond the maximum allowable variance of 25% above or below the provincial quota in extraordinary circumstances. The electoral district of Kenora is geographically the largest in the province and one of the largest in Canada. Its census population is 55,977, a variance of 47.30% below the provincial quota. In accordance with the decision of its predecessor, the Commission continues to believe that it is appropriate to apply the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to the electoral district of Kenora.

At some of the hearings held in Northern Ontario, the Commission received submissions recommending that it apply the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to other electoral districts in the North. The Commission disagrees.

While the Commission is willing to recognize that electoral districts in Northern Ontario will have smaller populations than other Ontario electoral districts, it falls that after applying the extraordinary circumstances rule to the electoral district of Kenora, there is sufficient population in the balance of Northern Ontario to create nine electoral districts that are within the maximum allowable negative variance. The decision for Kenora is consistent with the emphasis in the Act on manageable geographic size for sparsely populated, rural or northern regions, and there is no need to make further use of the extraordinary circumstances rule.

The work of the previous commission in Ontario revealed an inherent flaw in the procedure outlined in the Act for preparing a proposal, conducting public hearings, and submitting a report. In 2003, Northern Ontario had 11 electoral districts. The previous commission determined that the number of electoral districts in the region should be reduced by one. Its proposal eliminated the electoral district of Nickel Belt and established boundaries for 10 electoral districts in the region.

However, as a result of submissions received at public hearings, the previous commission decided to retain the electoral district of Nickel Belt and to eliminate the electoral district of Timiskaming—Cochrane. It also substantially altered the Commission's Report for the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. The result was that the City of Temiskaming Shores found itself within the boundaries of an electoral district named Nipissing—Timiskaming, and the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst were removed from the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay and placed within the boundaries of an electoral district named Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. This happened without any notice to these communities. The procedure did not afford them an opportunity to appear at a public hearing or to make written submissions before the report was submitted to the House of Commons.

This Commission holds the view that those communities were effectively denied due process. They were not afforded the opportunity to consider or advise the previous commission of their views on the extent, if any, to which they had a community of interest with or historical attachment to other communities in the electoral districts to which they were ultimately assigned.

As well, the previous commission had inadvertently divided the Nipissing 10 First Nation between the electoral districts of Nickel Belt and Nipissing—Timiskaming.

When the Commission began drafting its Proposal as it related to Northern Ontario, it had already received correspondence from the municipal association representing the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst. This correspondence deplored the decision in the 2003 redistribution, advised that the Highway 11 communities had no community of interest with the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing, and requested that the communities be reassigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay.

The Commission began its work in Northern Ontario by proposing that the boundaries of the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay be adjusted to include the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst. The census population of the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing was 74,828, which was 29.55% below the provincial quota. The reassignment of the communities along the Highway 11 corridor further reduced the population in that electoral district. In order to address that population deficiency, the Commission proposed substantial adjustments to the electoral district of Nickel Belt. It extended the boundaries of the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing easterly to include most of the electoral district of Nickel Belt lying west, south and east of the City of Sudbury, south of Highway 17. It proposed to rename that electoral district Algoma—Manitoulin—Killarney.

That adjustment resulted in a population deficiency in the electoral district of Nickel Belt. The Commission proposed to address that deficiency by extending the boundaries of the electoral district of Nickel Belt east and north into the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming to include that part of the electoral district lying north of Highway 64. The Commission believed there were communities of interest in agriculture and language among those communities that would have been included in the revised boundaries of the proposed electoral district of Nickel Belt—Timiskaming.

In turn, that adjustment resulted in a population deficiency in the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming. The Commission proposed to address that deficiency by adjusting the boundary of the northeast part of the electoral district of Parry Sound—Muskoka by moving that boundary to the west and reassigning that area to the proposed electoral district of Nipissing.

In addition to the electoral district of Kenora, the boundary adjustments proposed for Northern Ontario resulted in the region maintaining nine other electoral districts, each of which had a population within the maximum negative variance permitted by the Act.

The Commission's proposals for Northern Ontario began to unravel at the public hearings. In Sudbury, the Commission heard that, in fact, there was no community of interest in agriculture between the area of Nipissing—Timiskaming lying north of Highway 64 and the electoral district of Nickel Belt. There was strong opposition to the reassignment of a substantial part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt to the proposed electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Killarney.

In New Liskeard, the Commission learned that the City of Temiskaming Shores did not feel that it had a community of interest with the electoral district of Nickel Belt. While its preferred community of interest lay with the Town of Kirkland Lake and other communities to the north, the City acknowledged that the population of the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay was already too large to accommodate it. Its preferred community of interest therefore lay with the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming.

The Member of Parliament for Timmins—James Bay submitted that the community of interest among farmers and people associated with agriculture in the farming area west and north of the City of Temiskaming Shores flowed north along Highway 11, and that there was no community of interest with people involved in agriculture in the electoral district of Nickel Belt. The Member also expressed concern about the ability to serve constituents effectively if the communities along Highway 11 from the Town of Smooth Rock Falls to west of the Town of Hearst were included in the electoral district. This was the first hint of what the Commission considers to be inappropriate involvement by a Member of Parliament in the electoral redistribution process.

In North Bay, the Commission learned that the communities from the northeast part of the electoral district of Parry Sound—Muskoka had no community of interest with the City of North Bay or with the proposed electoral district of Nipissing. The arguments presented on behalf of those communities were persuasive.

The Member of Parliament for Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing requested that the Commission retain the current boundaries of that electoral district or, if necessary, invoke the extraordinary circumstances rule in the Act to accommodate a population below the maximum negative variance from the provincial quota. When informed of the written submission from the municipal association representing the Highway 11 communities, which requested a transfer of its communities to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay, the Member advised the Commission to expect correspondence from the association expressing a contrary request. The Commission did receive such a letter a few days following the hearing in North Bay. However, the wording of that letter strongly suggests yet more inappropriate involvement by a Member of Parliament in the electoral redistribution process.

The Commission had proposed that the Township of Lake of the Woods be removed from the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Rainy River and be included in the electoral district of Kenora. That proposal was based on the assumption that the First Nation communities located within the township had a stronger community of interest with Kenora than with Thunder Bay or Fort Frances. The Commission learned at the public hearing in Kenora that its assumption was mistaken because of the significant travel distance between the township and the City of Kenora.

The advice received at those public hearings, combined with the inappropriate involvement of at least two Members of Parliament, persuaded the Commission to conclude that the status quo, with a few minor boundary adjustments, is the best solution it can achieve for Northern Ontario.

The boundaries of the electoral district of KENORA remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 55,977, which is 47.30% below the provincial quota. The Commission has determined that the extraordinary circumstances rule applies to this electoral district.

The boundaries of the electoral district of THUNDER BAY—RAINY RIVER remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 82,984, which is 21.87% below the provincial quota.

The Commission was persuaded by numerous submissions that the Township of Manitouwadge has a stronger community of interest with the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Superior North than with the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The electoral district of THUNDER BAY—SUPERIOR NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus the Township of Manitouwadge and that part of the current electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing lying north of Highway 17 in Thunder Bay, Unorganized. It has a population of 82,827, which is 22.02% below the provincial quota.

The current electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing has a census population of 74,828, which is 29.55% below the provincial quota. Significant adjustments were required to increase the population of this electoral district to an acceptable level. The Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie which would see a number of communities transferred from it to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing to make up that population shortfall. The Commission then held a public hearing in Sault Ste. Marie in order to give the public an opportunity to comment on the revised Proposal. Not surprisingly, all persons who spoke, with the exception of one, were opposed to the revised Proposal. Presenters suggested that, if the Commission needed to find more population, it should be taken from the Sudbury area.

For the reasons outlined earlier in this Report, that option was no longer possible. As part of its decision to retain 10 electoral districts for Northern Ontario, and after accepting a population for the electoral district of Kenora that is substantially below the maximum negative variance permitted by the Act, the Commission was determined to create nine additional electoral districts, each with a population falling within the maximum allowable negative variance. It therefore concluded that the only feasible place to locate the necessary population was in the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie. The Commission believes that the communities it selected have some community of interest with other similar-sized communities along Highway 17 in the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing.

The electoral district of ALGOMA—MANITOULIN—KAPUSKASING is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Township of Manitouwadge and that part of Thunder Bay, Unorganized lying north of Highway 17, assigned to the electoral district of Thunder Bay—Superior North; plus the Townships of Macdonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional, Laird, Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional, Johnson, St. Joseph, Jocelyn, Hilton, and Plummer Additional, the Village of Hilton Beach, the Town of Bruce Mines, and the geographic Township of Aberdeen, formerly part of the electoral district of Sault Ste. Marie; and plus a part of Sudbury, Unorganized, North Part, lying north of the geographic Townships of Silk, Horwood, Hardiman, and Regan, and west of the geographic Township of Crothers, formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt. It has a population of 79,801, which is 24.87% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SAULT STE. MARIE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Townships of Macdonald, Meredith and Aberdeen Additional, Laird, Tarbutt and Tarbutt Additional, Johnson, St. Joseph, Jocelyn, Hilton, and Plummer Additional, the Village of Hilton Beach, the Town of Bruce Mines, and the geographic Township of Aberdeen, assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing. It has a population of 82,052, which is 22.75% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NICKEL BELT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: slightly adjusted along the northern boundary of the electoral district of Sudbury; less that part of Nipissing 10 First Nation, assigned to the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming; less that part of Sudbury, Unorganized, North Part assigned to the electoral district of Algoma—Manitoulin—Kapuskasing; and less the northwest part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part, assigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. It has a population of 90,962, which is 14.36% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SUDBURY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted in two locations along its northern boundary. It has a population of 92,048, which is 13.34% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of TIMMINS—JAMES BAY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus the northwest part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part, formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt; and plus the Townships of Hudson and Harris as well as that part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part lying west of the westerly boundary of the City of Temiskaming Shores and north of the northern boundaries of the Township of Coleman and the geographic Townships of Kittson, Dane, and Leo, formerly part of the electoral district of Nipissing—Timiskaming. It has a population of 83,104, which is 21.76% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIPISSING—TIMISKAMING is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of Nipissing 10 First Nation formerly part of the electoral district of Nickel Belt; less the Townships of Hudson and Harris as well as that part of Timiskaming, Unorganized, West Part lying west of the westerly boundary of the City of Temiskaming Shores and north of the northern boundaries of the Township of Coleman and the geographic Townships of Kittson, Dane, and Leo, assigned to the electoral district of Timmins—James Bay. It has a population of 90,996, which is 14.33% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PARRY SOUND—MUSKOKA remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 91,263, which is 14.08% below the provincial quota.

Southwestern Ontario

Windsor and Chatham-Kent

The total population in this area is 465,958, warranting four electoral districts. In order to adjust population in the electoral district of Essex, and in response to requests to return the rural area of the electoral district of Windsor—Tecumseh to the electoral district of Essex, the Commission proposed to assign that part of the electoral district of Windsor—Tecumseh south of Highway 401 to the largely rural electoral district of Essex. In addition, the Commission proposed that the easterly portion of the Town of Lakeshore be assigned to the electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex.

Notwithstanding the proposed changes, the electoral district of Essex remained one of the most populated in the province. The recommendations made at the public hearing held in Windsor were to leave the boundaries of the electoral districts of Windsor West and Windsor—Tecumseh unchanged. The overwhelming sentiment expressed at the public hearing and in written submissions was that residents of this region strongly preferred community of interest over population equality. The Commission has been persuaded by these arguments.

The electoral district of WINDSOR WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the northerly boundary of the airport. It has a population of 118,973, which is 12.01% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WINDSOR—TECUMSEH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the northerly boundary of the airport. It has a population of 115,528, which is 8.77% above the provincial quota.

The Commission proposed to transfer Pelee Island to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex (renamed Chatham-Kent in the Proposal) from the electoral district of Essex. No concerns were raised to that change, but recommendations were made to include the Municipality of Leamington in the name of the electoral district, as that area represents one third of the electoral district's population.

In order to adjust population between the revised electoral districts of Essex and Chatham-Kent, the Commission has decided to assign that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying east of Rochester Townline Road to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex, and to change the name of that electoral district to Chatham-Kent—Leamington.

The electoral district of ESSEX is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the Town of Lakeshore lying east of Rochester Townline Road, assigned to the current electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Essex. It has a population of 120,477, which is 13.43% above the provincial quota.

The Commission has made a minor adjustment to the boundaries at the northeast corner of the former City of Chatham, in order to merge the small pocket of urban development situated in the electoral district of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex with the adjoining urban development in the former City of Chatham.

The electoral district of CHATHAM-KENT—LEAMINGTON (formerly named Chatham-Kent—Essex) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Essex lying east of Rochester Townline Road; plus a part of the current electoral district of Lambton—Kent—Middlesex lying northeast of the former City of Chatham; and plus the Township of Pelee, formerly part of the electoral district of Essex. It has a population of 111,866, which is 5.32% above the provincial quota.

Sarnia

The boundaries of the electoral district of SARNIA—LAMBTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 106,293, which is 0.08% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of HURON—BRUCE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,842, which is 1.29% below the provincial quota.

London, Oxford, Elgin and Middlesex

The City of London and adjacent areas have a population of 679,136, warranting six electoral districts. In its Proposal, the Commission adjusted the population of the three electoral districts within the City of London.

At the public hearing held in London, submissions with respect to the City focused on the communities of Old South and White Oaks, though recommendations were divided. The Commission accepts that the urban portion of White Oaks currently in the electoral district of Elgin—Middlesex—London should be assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe in order to consolidate that urban community. As well, it accepts that the community of Old South should be within one electoral district.

Those decisions required further adjustments to the boundaries of the electoral districts within the City of London.

The electoral district of LONDON WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Wonderland Road North, north of the Thames River and the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of London North Centre. It has a population of 119,090, which is 12.12% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LONDON NORTH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of London West lying east of Wonderland Road North, north of the Thames River and the rail line; less that part lying east and south of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe. It has a population of 118,079, which is 11.17% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LONDON—FANSHAWE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of London North Centre lying east and south of the rail line; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Elgin—Middlesex—London lying east of Ernest Avenue and Meg Drive, north of Exeter Road and Highway 401 to the City of London boundary. It has a population of 119,334, which is 12.35% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LAMBTON—KENT—MIDDLESEX is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the urban area lying northeast of the former City of Chatham, assigned to the electoral district of Chatham-Kent—Leamington. It has a population of 105,919, which is 0.28% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ELGIN—MIDDLESEX—LONDON is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Ernest Avenue and Meg Drive, north of Exeter Road and Highway 401 to the City of London boundary, assigned to the electoral district of London—Fanshawe. It has a population of 110,109, which is 3.67% above the provincial quota.

The Commission has adjusted the boundaries of the electoral districts east of the electoral district of Oxford to accommodate and balance the significant population increases in the Kitchener, Waterloo, and Cambridge area. As a result, it was necessary to adjust the boundary between the electoral districts of Oxford and Brant.

The electoral district of OXFORD is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Brant lying west of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road. It has a population of 108,656, which is 2.30% above the provincial quota.

Central South Ontario

Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Brant, Brantford and Guelph

The Cities of Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, Brant, and Brantford, the Township of North Dumfries, and surrounding areas, have a combined population of 644,198. This warrants an additional electoral district, for a total of six. The City of Waterloo has a population sufficient to establish an electoral district within its boundaries, while the City of Kitchener is too large and the City of Brant is too small.

In its Proposal, the Commission stated that the population of the City of Cambridge was sufficient to establish an electoral district within its municipal boundaries.

The proposal for this area hinged on the creation of a new electoral district composed of part of the City of Kitchener, the whole of the Township of North Dumfries, and part of the City of Brant. Submissions from residents and public officials from all three areas were resoundingly opposed to the boundaries of the proposed new electoral district.

Following the first public hearing in Cambridge, the Commission concluded that the Cities of Brantford and Brant, and the First Nations of Six Nations and New Credit, constitute a unique community of interest that works best in a single electoral district, notwithstanding the high population.

The Commission was advised that an additional electoral district was not required in this area. This advice was reinforced by submissions from public officials and residents of the electoral district of Perth—Wellington, who argued that the communities in their electoral district located west of the Kitchener-Waterloo area have a stronger community of interest with the Townships of Wilmot and Wellesley than with the Townships of Mapleton, Minto, and Wellington North.

The Commission also received submissions recommending that the Townships of Mapleton, Minto, Wellington North, and Woolwich be assigned to the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills, and that the Town of Halton Hills be assigned to an electoral district in Halton Region.

Supported by such advice, the Commission developed a revised Proposal which removed one electoral district from the Kitchener—Waterloo area and reassigned it to Halton Region.

The Commission conducted a second public hearing in Cambridge. Despite reflecting the advice received at the first hearing, the revised Proposal had little support. As a result, the Commission reverted to its original Proposal, with adjustments to distribute population more equitably.

The Commission decided to maintain the boundaries of the electoral district of Perth—Wellington because it is a largely rural, agricultural electoral district, and does not have any significant community of interest with the Townships of Wellesley and Wilmot. Their communities of interest are more closely associated with the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo. The typical rural-urban tension does not exist in this region because of close socio-economic ties between the communities.

The Commission learned during the second public hearing that the preferred community of interest of the Township of North Dumfries was with the City of Cambridge. The Commission also learned of a community of interest between the southern portion of the City of Kitchener and that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401 (formerly the Town of Hespeler).

The electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills completely surrounds the electoral district of Guelph. The boundaries of the electoral district of Guelph are the city's municipal boundaries. Its current population is 121,688. The population of the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills is 115,880. While the populations of both electoral districts are high, they cannot be adjusted without unreasonably interfering with municipal boundaries.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PERTH—WELLINGTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,912, which is 1.22% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KITCHENER—CONESTOGA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road, assigned to the new electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler; plus those parts of the current electoral districts of Kitchener—Waterloo and Kitchener Centre lying south of University Avenue West, east of Trussler Road, north of Conestoga Parkway, and west of Fischer-Hallman Road. It has a population of 93,827, which is 11.66% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WATERLOO (formerly named Kitchener—Waterloo) is composed of the City of Waterloo, plus that part of the City of Kitchener lying north of the rail line and east of Conestoga Parkway. It has a population of 103,192, which is 2.84% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KITCHENER CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the City of Kitchener lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road, north of the rail line, and west of Conestoga Parkway; less that part of the current electoral district lying west of Fischer-Hallman Road, assigned to the electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga; and less that part lying southeast of Fairway Road North and Woolner Drive to Zeller Drive, assigned to the new electoral district of Kitchener South—Hespeler. It has a population of 102,433, which is 3.56% below the provincial quota.

The population of the City of Cambridge is 126,748. In its Proposal, the Commission endeavoured to respect the integrity of the City's municipal boundaries by using them to create a single electoral district. However, in order to balance populations in the electoral districts lying to the south of the Cities of Kitchener and Waterloo, and to accommodate communities of interest expressed at the second public hearing, the Commission has decided to create an electoral district composed of a part of the City of Kitchener and that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401.

The electoral district of KITCHENER SOUTH—HESPELER is composed of the following: that part of the City of Cambridge lying north of Highway 401 (Hespeler); plus that part of the current electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga lying east of Fischer-Hallman Road; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Kitchener Centre lying southeast of Fairway Road North and Woolner Drive to Zeller Drive. It has a population of 97,673, which is 8.04% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of CAMBRIDGE is composed of the following: that part of the City of Cambridge lying south of Highway 401 (Preston and Galt); plus the Township of North Dumfries; and plus that part of the City of Brant lying north of Paris Plains Church Road, Scenic Drive, and Howell Road. It has a population of 111,693, which is 5.16% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRANT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the City of Brant lying north of Paris Plains Church Road, Scenic Drive, and Howell Road, assigned to the electoral district of Cambridge; and less that part of the City of Brant lying west of Etonia Road and East Quarter Townline Road, assigned to the electoral district of Oxford. It has a population of 132,443, which is 24.70% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of HALDIMAND—NORFOLK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,051, which is 1.73% above the provincial quota.

Following the second public hearing in Cambridge, the Commission decided not to eliminate the electoral district of Kitchener—Conestoga. That decision was reinforced by submissions at a second public hearing in Oakville, where the Commission learned that the Town of Halton Hills has a stronger community of interest with communities in the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills than with those in an electoral district in Halton Region.

While the municipal council of the Town of Halton Hills supported the Commission's revised Proposal to include the Town in a new electoral district with part of the Town of Milton, the municipal council of the Town of Milton unanimously rejected that proposal.

The boundaries of the electoral district of WELLINGTON—HALTON HILLS remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 115,880, which is 9.10% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of GUELPH remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 121,688, which is 14.57% above the provincial quota.

Halton, Hamilton and Niagara

Burlington, Oakville and Halton

Halton Region, which includes the Town of Halton Hills, has a population of 501,669. The previous commission assigned the Town of Halton Hills to the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills, a primarily rural electoral district. Initially, the Commission proposed to leave the boundaries of that electoral district unchanged. This resulted in a population of 442,661 for the balance of Halton Region, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of four, with populations on the high side of the provincial quota.

The Commission held a public hearing in Oakville, where it received submissions that caused it to re-examine Halton Region. The Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the Region that included the Town of Halton Hills. The new total population was sufficient to allocate five electoral districts to Halton Region. However, in order to draw acceptable boundaries for all five electoral districts, the Commission had to divide the Town of Milton into its older and more recently developed areas for assignment to separate electoral districts.

The Commission held a further public hearing in Oakville to discuss the revised Proposal. Public reaction was significant. As noted above, with the exception of the municipal council of the Town of Halton Hills, there was virtually no support for the revised Proposal.

The Commission believes that its initial Proposal, with some minor adjustments, offers the best solution for the area. It involves the creation of one new electoral district in Halton Region, for a total of four. As stated earlier, the Commission determined that the boundaries of the electoral district of Wellington—Halton Hills should remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order.

The boundaries of the electoral district of OAKVILLE SOUTH (formerly named Oakville) remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 119,649, which is 12.65% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OAKVILLE NORTH—BURLINGTON (formerly part of the electoral district of Halton) is composed of the balance of the City of Oakville, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying east of Highway 407 and not included in the electoral district of Burlington. It has a population of 114,378, which is 7.69% above the provincial quota.

That decision responds to the objections and concerns of Burlington residents who stated that their community of interest and identity was with urban Burlington, that they had no community of interest with the Town of Milton, and that they preferred inclusion in an urban electoral district over correspondence with the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BURLINGTON is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying southeast of Dundas Street, west of Highway 407 and north of Guelph Line. It has a population of 120,569, which is 13.52% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MILTON (formerly part of the electoral district of Halton) is composed of the Town of Milton, plus that part of the City of Burlington lying northwest of Dundas Street and Highway 407. It has a population of 88,065, which is 17.09% below the provincial quota.

Hamilton

The City of Hamilton has a population of 519,949, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of five. Initially, the Commission proposed a new electoral district named Ancaster. It was composed of the urban area that included the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale, plus parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain.

The Commission also proposed a primarily rural electoral district to be called Waterdown—Glanbrook. With the population of the electoral district of Hamilton Mountain being too high, the Commission drew its southern boundary along Rymal Road to balance population. The result was that about 7,200 people, whose community of interest had always been with the urban electoral district of Hamilton Mountain, were assigned to the proposed rural electoral district of Waterdown—Glanbrook.

The Commission held two days of public hearings in Hamilton and heard significant objections to the proposed electoral district of Ancaster. The Commission was told that residents of the parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain assigned to the proposed electoral district have no community of interest or identity with the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale. Urban residents of the area lying south of Rymal Road also objected to the Proposal assigning them to a rural electoral district.

In response to those objections and concerns, the Commission prepared a revised Proposal for the City of Hamilton that substantially changed the electoral boundaries of all five proposed electoral districts. The Commission held a further public hearing in Hamilton to discuss the revised Proposal. There was substantial public reaction and objection to the proposed boundary revisions. The Commission learned that the parts of the electoral districts of Hamilton Centre and Hamilton Mountain originally assigned to the proposed electoral district of Ancaster in fact do have a significant community of interest and identity with the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale.

The Commission concluded that the approach it set out in its initial Proposal, with a few minor adjustments, was the best solution for the City of Hamilton. The Commission was not able to accommodate the preference of residents south of Rymal Road to be in an urban electoral district. However, they do constitute a significant community in the rural electoral district to which they have been assigned.

The electoral district of ANCASTER (formerly part of the electoral district of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale) is composed of the following: those parts of the communities of Ancaster, Dundas and Westdale lying south of the rail line and north of the electric power transmission line, bordered on the east by the electoral districts of Burlington, Hamilton Centre, and Hamilton Mountain, and on the west by Highway 52 North and Trinity Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Centre lying south of the Niagara Escarpment; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Mountain lying west of Garth Street and north of Rymal Road West. It has a population of 109,535, which is 3.13% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of FLAMBOROUGH—GLANBROOK (formerly part of the electoral districts of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale and Niagara West—Glanbrook) is composed of the current electoral district of Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale, adjusted as follows: less that part assigned to the electoral district of Ancaster; plus that part of the City of Hamilton assigned to the current electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton Mountain lying south of Rymal Road. It has a population of 97,081, which is 8.60% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of the Niagara Escarpment, assigned to the new electoral district of Ancaster; plus that part of the current electoral district of Hamilton East—Stoney Creek lying west of Kenilworth Avenue and south of Burlington Street East. It has a population of 101,932, which is 4.03% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON MOUNTAIN is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Garth Street and north of Rymal Road West, assigned to the new electoral district of Ancaster; and less that part lying south of Rymal Road, assigned to the electoral district of Flamborough—Glanbrook. It has a population of 103,615, which is 2.45% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HAMILTON EAST—STONEY CREEK is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of Kenilworth Avenue and south of Burlington Street East, assigned to the electoral district of Hamilton Centre. It has a population of 107,786, which is 1.48% above the provincial quota.

Niagara

Niagara Region has a population of 431,346, warranting four electoral districts. With the census population of the electoral district of Niagara Falls being 128,357, the Commission endeavoured to balance population in the region more evenly. It proposed electoral districts aligned on an east–west axis rather than on a north–south axis. The Town of Fort Erie was assigned to an electoral district that included the Cities of Welland and Port Colborne and the Township of Wainfleet.

The Commission held a public hearing in Niagara Falls. It received numerous submissions suggesting that the City of Niagara Falls and the Towns of Fort Erie and Niagara-on-the-Lake, despite their combined high population, have a unique community of interest. They form a border with the United States along the Niagara River and, as a consequence, share numerous services and issues. The common thread of the submissions was that this unique community of interest should override concern for population equality. The Commission agrees.

The Commission also received persuasive submissions that the Cities of Port Colborne, Welland and Thorold all had a community of interest linked to the Welland Canal, thus calling for an electoral district with a north–south axis.

The Commission heard submissions suggesting that the area of St. Catharines known as Merritton has a significant community of interest with the City of Thorold and other communities in the current electoral district of Welland. The Commission does not find those submissions persuasive.

The Commission also received submissions from residents of the community of Dunnville, which is located near the southeastern boundary of the electoral district of Haldimand—Norfolk, requesting that their area be added to an electoral district in Niagara Region. The Commission does not find those submissions persuasive. Dunnville is located within Haldimand County, not within Niagara Region. One consistent message the Commission received throughout the seven weeks of public hearings was that, wherever possible, it should not interfere with county or regional boundaries.

The boundaries of the electoral district of NIAGARA FALLS remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 128,357, which is 20.85% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIAGARA CENTRE (formerly part of the electoral district of Welland) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Township of Wainfleet, and less that part of the City of St. Catharines lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road, both assigned to the electoral district of Niagara West. It has a population of 105,860, which is 0.33% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NIAGARA WEST (formerly part of the electoral district of Niagara West—Glanbrook) is composed of the Towns of Grimsby, Lincoln and Pelham, the Townships of West Lincoln and Wainfleet, and that part of the City of St. Catharines lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road. It has a population of 86,533, which is 18.53% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ST. CATHARINES is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of First Louth Street, Highway 406, Third Louth Street and Courtleigh Road. It has a population of 110,596, which is 4.13% above the provincial quota.

Georgian Bay, Barrie and Simcoe

The Georgian Bay and Simcoe area has a population of 741,871, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of seven. During the past 10 years, the population of the City of Barrie has increased dramatically, and this growth is expected to continue. The population is too high for one electoral district. When formulating its Proposal, the Commission's options were to divide the city on an east–west axis, using Highway 400 as a boundary, or on a north–south axis, using a municipal street as a boundary. At the time of preparing its Proposal, the north–south option seemed more reasonable. In its Proposal, the Commission divided the City of Barrie along Dunlop Street and added rural areas to both of the resulting Barrie electoral districts.

The incorporation of rural areas into those two electoral districts required some population adjustments in other electoral districts. The population of the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey was high. To adjust it, the Commission proposed that the Town of The Blue Mountains, which lies entirely within Grey County, be transferred from the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey to the electoral district of Bruce—Grey—Owen Sound. The Commission next proposed that the Township of Mulmur be transferred from the electoral district of Dufferin—Caledon to the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey. Finally, the Commission proposed that the Township of Springwater be transferred from the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey to the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

The population of the electoral district of Simcoe North was also high. To adjust it, the Commission proposed that the Township of Oro-Medonte be transferred from that electoral district to the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

To balance populations elsewhere, the Commission added the Town of Innisfil to the proposed electoral district of Barrie South and the north half of the Township of Uxbridge from Durham Region to the electoral district of York—Simcoe.

At the public hearing held in Barrie, the Commission heard persuasive objections to its proposal to adjust population by crossing county lines, notably in assigning the Township of Mulmur and the north half of the Township of Uxbridge to electoral districts beyond their county boundaries.

Furthermore, the Commission learned that, although the Town of The Blue Mountains lies within the boundaries of Grey County, its community of interest is strongly and significantly with the Town of Collingwood and other communities in the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey. It has no significant community of interest or identity with communities in Grey County.

The Commission also learned that residents of the area lying northeast of 9 Line in the Township of Oro-Medonte have a much greater community of interest with communities in the electoral district of Simcoe North than with communities in the proposed electoral district of Barrie North.

The Commission received submissions at the public hearing recommending the creation of one completely urban Barrie electoral district, and a second Barrie electoral district composed of the balance of urban Barrie plus the rural area surrounding the city to the north, west and south. The Commission also heard submissions objecting to that recommendation. It was clear to the Commission that the Town of Innisfil has developed a significant community of interest with the south part of the City of Barrie, and that it does not have any community of interest with the rural areas west and north of the City of Barrie.

There was one common thread of opinion at the public hearing in Barrie and in written submissions received with respect to the Georgian Bay and Simcoe area: people are significantly more concerned about community of interest and historical attachment than correspondence with the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of BRUCE—GREY—OWEN SOUND remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 106,475, which is 0.25% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of DUFFERIN—CALEDON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 116,341, which is 9.54% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SIMCOE—GREY is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Township of Springwater, assigned to the new electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater. It has a population of 116,307, which is 9.50% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SIMCOE NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwest of 9 Line and Moonstone Road East, assigned to the new electoral district of Barrie—Oro—Springwater. It has a population of 108,672, which is 2.32% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BARRIE—ORO—SPRINGWATER is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Barrie lying north of Dunlop Street West and Tiffin Street; plus the Township of Springwater, formerly part of the electoral district of Simcoe—Grey; and plus that part of the Township of Oro-Medonte lying southwest of 9 Line and Moonstone Road East, formerly part of the electoral district of Simcoe North. It has a population of 97,876, which is 7.85% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BARRIE—INNISFIL is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Barrie lying south of Dunlop Street West and Tiffin Street; plus the Town of Innisfil, formerly part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe. It has a population of 101,584, which is 4.36% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of YORK—SIMCOE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Town of Innisfil, assigned to the electoral district of Barrie—Innisfil; and less that part of the Town of East Gwillimbury lying south of Green Lane and west of Highway 404, assigned to the electoral district of Newmarket—Aurora. It has a population of 94,616, which is 10.92% below the provincial quota.

Brampton and Mississauga

The combined population of the Cities of Brampton and Mississauga is 1,237,354, warranting three additional electoral districts for a total of 11. The Commission assigned two of the new electoral districts to the City of Brampton, and one to the City of Mississauga. It proposed substantial boundary changes because of significant population shifts and growth in the last decade, but managed to respect municipal boundaries.

The Commission held public hearings in both cities. The public was generally supportive of the Commission's Proposal, but there were several suggestions for changes to respect historical attachment, communities of interest, patterns of service provision, and the location of local landmarks. In particular, there were significant concerns about the Commission's Proposal, which divided the community of Malton, and questions about whether that community should be assigned to an electoral district in the City of Brampton or in the City of Mississauga. The Commission decided that the community should not be divided and that it should be located in an electoral district in the City of Mississauga. This decision reflects the Commission's desire to respect municipal boundaries wherever possible. The result, however, is that the populations of electoral districts in the City of Mississauga are high.

Several residents expressed concerns that the Proposal divided the historical core of the City of Brampton as well as the community of Heart Lake in the northern portion of the electoral district of Brampton West. Addressing those concerns required changes to the boundaries of other Brampton electoral districts to balance population.

With respect to the City of Mississauga, the majority of submissions accepted the Commission's Proposal, but suggested small boundary changes that would better reflect communities of interest. There were several suggestions to use ward boundaries and various natural boundaries as guides for designing electoral districts. The Commission gave these exhaustive consideration, but could not accommodate them all because they would have created insurmountable problems in balancing population.

Submissions at the hearing pointed out that the Commission's Commission's Report had split the historic community of Cooksville as well as the core of the City of Mississauga. The Commission has redrawn boundaries in both areas in response to those concerns.

Brampton

The electoral district of BRAMPTON WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying south of Embleton Road, Queen Street West to McLaughlin Road, and Williams Parkway West, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton South. It has a population of 108,368, which is 2.03% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Brampton West lying south of Embleton Road, Queen Street West to McLaughlin Road, and Williams Parkway West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of the City of Brampton municipal boundary and west of Hurontario Street. It has a population of 107,364, which is 1.08% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Bovaird Drive East to Highway 410 and Williams Parkway East, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton Centre; less that part lying east of Bramalea Road and north of Sandalwood Parkway East, assigned to the electoral district of Brampton East; plus that part of the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton lying west of Torbram Road and north of Williams Parkway East. It has a population of 105,345, which is 0.82% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON CENTRE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale lying south of Bovaird Drive East to Highway 410 and Williams Parkway East; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of the City of Brampton municipal boundary and east of Hurontario Street; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton lying west of Torbram Road, south of Williams Parkway East, and north of the municipal boundary. It has a population of 103,122, which is 2.91% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BRAMPTON EAST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Bramalea—Gore—Malton, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of the City of Brampton municipal boundary, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga North; less that part lying west of Torbram Road and south of Williams Parkway East, assigned to the new electoral district of Brampton Centre; less that part lying west of Torbram Road, north of Williams Parkway East and south of Bovaird Drive East, assigned to the electoral district of Brampton North; plus that part of the current electoral district of Brampton—Springdale lying east of Bramalea Road and north of Sandalwood Parkway East. It has a population of 99,712, which is 6.12% below the provincial quota.

Mississauga

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA WEST—STREETSVILLE (formerly named Mississauga—Streetsville) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of the Credit River and Creditview Road to Bristol Road West, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga North; less that part lying east of Creditview Road and south of Bristol Road West, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying north of Highway 401 and west of Mavis Road. It has a population of 118,757, which is 11.81% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA—ERIN MILLS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order for the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale, adjusted as follows: less that part lying east of the Credit River and northwest of Dundas Street West, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; and less that part lying southeast of Dundas Street West, assigned to the electoral district of Mississauga South. It has a population of 117,199, which is 10.34% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA CENTRE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale lying east of the Credit River and northwest of Dundas Street West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Streetsville lying south of Bristol Road West and east of Creditview Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying south of Bristol Road West to Fairwind Drive and Eglinton Avenue West to Hurontario Street; and plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga East—Cooksville lying north and west of Central Parkway. It has a population of 118,756, which is 11.81% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Erindale lying southeast of Dundas Street West. It has a population of 118,893, which is 11.94% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA NORTH is bounded as follows: on the north and on the east by the boundaries of the City of Mississauga; on the south by Eglinton Avenue and Highway 403 to Hurontario Street, Eglinton Avenue West to Fairwind Drive, and Bristol Road West to Creditview Road; and on the west by Creditview Road and the Credit River to Highway 401, and Mavis Road. It has a population of 118,046, which is 11.14% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MISSISSAUGA EAST—COOKSVILLE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north and west of Central Parkway, assigned to the new electoral district of Mississauga Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Mississauga—Brampton South lying southeast of Eglinton Avenue and Highway 403. It has a population of 121,792, which is 14.67% above the provincial quota.

York

The population of York County, excepting that part of the county lying within the electoral district of York—Simcoe, is 965,985. This warrants three additional electoral districts, for a total of nine. The challenge to create three new electoral districts within York County was significant. The objective of maintaining the integrity of municipal boundaries was not totally achievable.

The population of the Town of Newmarket (79,978) is not sufficient to support an electoral district. The same observation applies to the Town of Aurora (53,203). On the other hand, the population of the Town of Richmond Hill (185,541) is too large for a single electoral district.

When drawing boundaries for three new electoral districts in this region, the Commission was unable to maintain an electoral district solely within the boundaries of the former Town of Thornhill, a significant historical community centered around Yonge Street immediately north of the City of Toronto. In 1971, the provincial government established the City of Vaughan, whose southeastern boundary is Yonge Street, and the Town of Markham, whose southwestern boundary is Yonge Street, with the consequence that the legal entity of the Town of Thornhill ceased to exist. However, people residing in that area continue to enjoy a strong community of interest.

The Commission conducted two days of public hearings in Richmond Hill. There was strong opposition to dividing the Town of Aurora along Wellington Street. The municipal council of the Town of Aurora further objected to the use of that street as a boundary because it would divide the heart of the downtown.

Some advocates for keeping the Towns of Newmarket and Aurora whole suggested attaching parts of the Township of King and the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville to each municipality in order to create electoral districts with acceptable population variances from the provincial quota. However, besides the issue of an urban-rural split in the two suggested electoral districts, there remained the problem of how to divide the Town of Richmond Hill into two electoral districts with acceptable population variances.

The Commission also heard submissions that opposed the creation of mixed urban-rural electoral districts out of fear that the views and issues championed by urban residents would dominate and override those of rural residents.

The Commission received submissions expressing concern about the proposed southern boundary between the electoral districts of Aurora—Richmond Hill and Richmond Hill, which divided the core of the older part of the Town of Richmond Hill.

The Commission also received submissions from residents of the historical community of Thornhill, strongly urging the retention of an electoral district named Thornhill to encompass all of that community, including the part east of Bayview Avenue and west of Highway 404. The Commission endeavoured to draw electoral boundaries that would achieve that result, but the effect on the populations of adjacent electoral districts made it impossible.

The Commission also received submissions expressing concern that the boundaries in the Proposal divided each of the communities of Milliken Mills and Markham Village.

Newmarket, Aurora and Richmond Hill

The combined population of the Towns of Newmarket, Aurora and Richmond Hill, as well as that part of the Town of Markham lying north of Highway 407, west of Highway 404 and east of Bayview Avenue, is 323,171. This warrants the creation of three urban electoral districts, each with a population equivalent to the provincial quota.

The Commission tried, without success, to establish a boundary other than Wellington Street to separate the proposed electoral districts of Newmarket—Aurora and Aurora—Richmond Hill. The Commission was unable to find a feasible combination of streets and natural boundaries that could provide the required population balance.

The Commission considered, but ultimately rejected, the suggestion that the Town of Aurora be divided on an east–west axis. That suggestion made it impossible to balance population adequately in adjacent electoral districts.

Similarly, the Commission considered, but ultimately rejected, the suggestion to create an electoral district composed of the whole of the Town of Aurora and the north part of the Town of Richmond Hill. That proposal would have resulted in an electoral district to the north composed of the Town of Newmarket and parts of the Township of King, the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville, or both – an urban-rural mix that the Commission considered undesirable in light of other submissions received.

The Commission was able to redraw the boundaries between the electoral districts of Aurora—Richmond Hill and Richmond Hill to avoid dividing the core of the older part of the Town of Richmond Hill.

In the Town of East Gwillimbury (part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe), there is a small urban area, having a population of 1,008, lying immediately to the north of the northern boundary of the Town of Newmarket whose community of interest is with the latter town.

The electoral district of NEWMARKET—AURORA is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the Town of Aurora lying south of Wellington Street, assigned to the new electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill; plus that part of the electoral district of York—Simcoe lying south of Green Lane and west of Highway 404. It has a population of 109,457, which is 3.05% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of AURORA—RICHMOND HILL (formerly part of the electoral district of Oak Ridges—Markham) is composed of the following: that part of the Town of Aurora lying south of Wellington Street; and that part of the Town of Richmond Hill lying north of a line drawn along Elgin Mills Road to Bayview Avenue, a creek from Bayview Avenue to Shirley Drive, and Major Mackenzie Drive East to the town limit. It has a population of 106,064, which is 0.14% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of RICHMOND HILL is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Elgin Mills Road West, and less that part lying north of a line drawn along Elgin Mills Road East to Bayview Avenue, a creek from Bayview Avenue to Shirley Drive, and Major Mackenzie Drive East to the town limit, both assigned to the new electoral district of Aurora—Richmond Hill; plus that part of the current electoral district of Thornhill lying east of Bayview Avenue and north of Highway 407. It has a population of 108,658, which is 2.30% above the provincial quota.

Vaughan

The combined population of that part of the Township of King not included in the electoral district of York—Simcoe (18,617), that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Bayview Avenue (18,194) and the City of Vaughan (288,301) is 325,122, warranting three electoral districts.

The electoral district of KING—VAUGHAN (formerly part of the electoral districts of Oak Ridges—Markham and Vaughan) is composed of that part of the Township of King lying south of Davis Drive West and Highway 9, and that part of the City of Vaughan lying north of Major Mackenzie Drive to Highway 400 and north of Rutherford Road. It has a population of 109,235, which is 2.85% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of VAUGHAN—WOODBRIDGE (formerly part of the electoral district of Vaughan) is composed of that part of the City of Vaughan lying south of Major Mackenzie Drive and west of Highway 400. It has a population of 105,450, which is 0.72% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of VAUGHAN—THORNHILL—MARKHAM (formerly named Thornhill) is composed of that part of the City of Vaughan lying south of Rutherford Road and east of Highway 400, plus that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Bayview Avenue. It has a population of 110,427, which is 3.97% above the provincial quota.

Markham

The combined population of the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville (37,628) and the part of the Town of Markham (279,066) not assigned to the electoral districts of Richmond Hill and Vaughan—Thornhill—Markham is 316,694, warranting three electoral districts. The Commission has revised the boundaries in its Proposal to address the concerns about having divided each of the communities of Milliken Mills and Markham Village.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—THORNHILL (formerly part of the electoral districts of Markham—Unionville and Thornhill) is composed of that part of the Town of Markham lying east of Bayview Avenue, south of Highway 407, and west of the Rouge River. It has a population of 102,221, which is 3.76% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—UNIONVILLE is composed of that part of the Town of Markham lying west of Highway 48 to 16th Avenue, west of McCowan Road to Highway 407, north of Highway 407, and east of Highway 404. It has a population of 104,693, which is 1.43% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of MARKHAM—STOUFFVILLE (formerly part of the electoral districts of Oak Ridges—Markham and Markham—Unionville) is composed of the following: the Town of Whitchurch-Stouffville; plus that part of the town of Markham lying east of Highway 48 to 16th Avenue, east of McCowan Road to Highway 407, and east of the Rouge River. It has a population of 109,780, which is 3.36% above the provincial quota.

City of Toronto

The population of the City of Toronto is 2,615,060, warranting two additional electoral districts for a total of 25. When assigning the new electoral districts, the Commission looked at population in four areas within the city's boundaries: the former Cities of Etobicoke and Scarborough, and the areas above and below Highway 401. The analysis confirmed that one new electoral district should be assigned to the area above Highway 401, and the second to the area below Highway 401.

The Commission conducted two days of public hearings in Toronto, where it heard and received more than 100 submissions each day. The focus of the submissions was on communities of interest. With a few exceptions, there was little concern expressed for balanced population or correspondence with the provincial quota.

Etobicoke

The area comprising the former City of Etobicoke is bounded as follows: on the west and north by the municipal boundaries of the City of Toronto; on the south by Lake Ontario; and on the east by the Humber River, which is a significant natural boundary. The population of that area is 347,948, warranting three electoral districts with populations that are high.

In its Proposal, the Commission attempted to balance population between the three electoral districts. It received written submissions objecting to the boundaries between the electoral districts of Etobicoke North and Etobicoke Centre, but does not find those objections persuasive.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE NORTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Etobicoke Centre lying west of Martin Grove Road, and north of Eglinton Avenue West and Highway 427. It has a population of 117,601, which is 10.72% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Martin Grove Road, and north of Eglinton Avenue and Highway 427, assigned to the electoral district of Etobicoke North; plus that part of the current electoral district of Etobicoke—Lakeshore lying west of Kipling Avenue and north of Bloor Street West. It has a population of 114,910, which is 8.19% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ETOBICOKE—LAKESHORE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying west of Kipling Avenue and north of Bloor Street West, assigned to the electoral district of Etobicoke Centre. It has a population of 115,437, which is 8.68% above the provincial quota.

Above Highway 401

The population of that part of the City of Toronto lying north of Highway 401 is 421,228, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of four. The Commission decided to use Highway 401 as a southern boundary for those four electoral districts.

The boundaries of the electoral district of YORK WEST remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,198, which is 1.87% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of YORK CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Bathurst Street and north of the electric power transmission line, assigned to the electoral district of Willowdale. It has a population of 100,277, which is 5.59% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WILLOWDALE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of York Centre lying east of Bathurst Street and north of the electric power transmission line; less that part lying east of Bayview Avenue, assigned to the new electoral district of Don Valley North. It has a population of 109,680, which is 3.26% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY NORTH is composed of that part of the current electoral district of Willowdale lying east of Bayview Avenue, and that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley East lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 103,073, which is 2.96% below the provincial quota.

Below Highway 401

The population of that part of the City of Toronto lying south of Highway 401 is 1,220,186, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of 12. At the public hearings in Toronto, the Commission received submissions urging that the following communities of interest remain intact and fall within the electoral districts to which they have been historically attached: the Annex, Seaton Village, the University of Toronto, Bedford Park, the community centred at Church Street and Wellesley Street, the Silverthorne area and Thorncliffe Park.

The population of the electoral district of York South—Weston is high. In its Proposal, the Commission attempted to balance population by assigning the part of that electoral district lying west of the rail line to the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. In turn, to balance population there, the Commission next proposed to transfer the area known as Bedford Park to the electoral district of Don Valley West. As a result of submissions received at the public hearings, the Commission is convinced that residents of that part of the electoral district of York South—Weston in question do not have a community of interest with the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. It is therefore unnecessary to assign the Bedford Park area to the electoral district of Don Valley West.

In a further attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed that part of the Silverthorne area be transferred from the electoral district of York South—Weston to the electoral district of Davenport. That proposal also met with serious opposition at the public hearings. Notwithstanding the high population in the electoral district of York South—Weston, the Commission is convinced that any attempt to balance population would negatively affect communities of interest within that electoral district.

The Commission received several submissions requesting that a significant part of the electoral district of St. Paul's be assigned to the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence. Given that the population of the electoral district of Eglinton—Lawrence is already above the provincial quota, the Commission is unable to accommodate this request.

In another attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed to assign a part of the electoral district of Davenport to the electoral district of St. Paul's. There were serious objections to that proposal in terms of its negative impact on communities of interest.

In drafting its Proposal, the Commission found that the population of the electoral district of Trinity—Spadina was high, while that of the neighbouring electoral district of St. Paul's was low. In an attempt to balance population, the Commission proposed to assign the areas lying north of Bloor Street, known as Seaton Village and the Annex, to the electoral district of St. Paul's. This also met with strenuous objections.

Residents of Seaton Village and the Annex argued that their community of interest is with the University of Toronto. The Commission received submissions that the University and its surrounding community should be included in one electoral district.

As a consequence of the significant opposition to the proposed boundary changes, the proposed new electoral district of Mount Pleasant was no longer viable. In response to the submissions at the public hearings, the Commission has instead created a new electoral district named University—Rosedale.

Other submissions dealt with population expansion from condominiums in the city centre and the waterfront. There were a range of suggestions, from creating a single electoral district for the condominiums to attaching the condominium development to the electoral district of Toronto Centre. The Commission closely examined all possibilities arising from those submissions, but none proved feasible with respect to balancing population.

In light of adjustments made after the hearings, the population of the electoral district of Trinity—Spadina remained high. The Commission determined that the best solution to adjust that population was to create a new electoral district named University—Rosedale, which would encompass in part the north portion of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina, and to assign the waterfront area of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre to an electoral district that includes the balance of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina.

Finally, in its Proposal, the Commission had divided the community centred at the intersection of Church Street and Wellesley Street. It has redrawn the boundaries to correct that oversight. Likewise, the Commission's Proposal had divided the community of Thorncliffe Park. It has corrected that oversight as well.

The boundaries of the electoral district of YORK SOUTH—WESTON remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 116,606, which is 9.79% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of PARKDALE—HIGH PARK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 105,103, which is 1.05% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of DAVENPORT remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 102,360, which is 3.63% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of EGLINTON—LAWRENCE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 113,150, which is 6.53% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of ST. PAUL'S is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part lying east of Mount Pleasant Road, assigned to the electoral district of Don Valley West. It has a population of 103,983, which is 2.10% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of UNIVERSITY—ROSEDALE is composed of the following: that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying north of Dundas Street West; plus that part of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre lying west of Bay Street, north of Charles Street to Bloor Street East to Sherbourne Street, and north of Rosedale Valley Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley West lying southwest of Bayview Avenue and south of Moore Avenue. It has a population of 99,566, which is 6.26% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SPADINA—FORT YORK (formerly named Trinity—Spadina) is composed of that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying south of Dundas Street West, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Dundas Street West, east of Bay Street and north of Front Street, assigned to the electoral district of Toronto Centre; plus that part of the current electoral district of Toronto Centre lying south of The Esplanade and Mill Street. It has a population of 82,480, which is 22.34% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of TORONTO CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Trinity—Spadina lying south of Dundas Street West, east of Bay Street and north of Front Street; less that part lying south of The Esplanade and Mill Street, assigned to the electoral district of Spadina—Fort York; and less that part lying west of Bay Street, north of Charles Street to Bloor Street East to Sherbourne Street, and north of Rosedale Valley Road, assigned to the new electoral district of University—Rosedale. It has a population of 93,971, which is 11.53% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY WEST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of St. Paul's lying east of Mount Pleasant Road; less that part lying east of Leslie Street, the Don River West Branch, and Don Mills Road, assigned to the electoral district of Don Valley East; and less that part lying southwest of Bayview Avenue and south of Moore Avenue, assigned to the new electoral district of University—Rosedale. It has a population of 98,859, which is 6.92% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of DON VALLEY EAST is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying north of Highway 401; plus that part of the current electoral district of Don Valley West lying east of Leslie Street, the Don River West Branch, and Don Mills Road. It has a population of 93,007, which is 12.43% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of TORONTO—DANFORTH remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 104,017, which is 2.07% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of BEACHES—EAST YORK remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 107,084, which is 0.82% above the provincial quota.

Scarborough

The area within the limits of the former City of Scarborough has a population of 625,698. The Commission's approach to the Scarborough area was to respect the former city boundary, and to treat this area, and its six electoral districts, as an historical community. As a result, the Commission assigned the Pickering portion of the current electoral district of Pickering—Scarborough East to an electoral district in Durham Region.

Following this decision, the Commission made adjustments within the former City of Scarborough to balance population. At the public hearings, the Commission learned that these adjustments split the communities of Morningside Heights and Malvern. There were also objections to losing the designation of Rouge River, which many considered to be historically significant, and to creating an electoral district in the east of the region that crossed Highway 401. Many presentations argued for a more natural north–south orientation for electoral districts in this region. Finally, the Commission was advised that, if the boundaries of an electoral district had to cross Highway 401, it was preferable that this occur in the more mature and developed western portion of the Scarborough area.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—AGINCOURT is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying south of Finch Avenue East and west of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Wexford; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge River lying west of Middlefield Road to the electric power transmission line, and west of McCowan Road to Highway 401. It has a population of 101,411, which is 4.52% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—WEXFORD is composed of that part of the electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt lying south of Finch Avenue East and west of the rail line, plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough Centre lying west of the rail line. It has a population of 101,840, which is 4.12% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of SCARBOROUGH SOUTHWEST remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 108,693, which is 2.33% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH—ROUGE (formerly named Scarborough—Rouge River) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Middlefield Road to the electric power transmission line, and west of McCowan Road to Highway 401, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Agincourt; plus that part of the current electoral district of Pickering—Scarborough East lying north of Highway 401 and west of the City of Toronto municipal boundary. It has a population of 102,270, which is 3.71% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of the rail line, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Wexford; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood lying west of Highland Creek and West Highland Creek to Scarborough Golf Club Road, and north of the rail line. It has a population of 111,503, which is 4.98% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of SCARBOROUGH EAST (formerly Pickering—Scarborough East) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part of the City of Pickering lying east of the City of Toronto municipal boundary, assigned to the electoral district of Pickering—Uxbridge; less that part lying north of Highway 401, assigned to the electoral district of Scarborough—Rouge; plus that part of the current electoral district of Scarborough—Guildwood lying east of Highland Creek and West Highland Creek to Scarborough Golf Club Road, and north of the rail line. It has a population of 99,981, which is 5.87% below the provincial quota.

Eastern Ontario

Ottawa

The City of Ottawa has a population of 883,391, warranting one additional electoral district for a total of eight. The Commission proposed minor changes to several electoral districts in relation to municipal boundaries that have not existed since amalgamation in 2001.

At the public hearings, the Commission received a recommendation to assign to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans those parts of the community of Carlsbad Springs currently in the electoral districts of Nepean—Carleton and Glengarry—Prescott—Russell because of the community of interest among Francophone residents there.

The boundary changes to include Carlsbad Springs in the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans affect the northeast boundary of the current electoral district of Nepean—Carleton in equivalent fashion.

The Commission was also asked to change the northwest boundary of the proposed electoral district of Nepean—Carleton slightly to include the Scotiabank Place area, which has always been clearly identified with Kanata, in the proposed electoral district of Kanata—Carleton.

The population of the electoral district of Ottawa South is high. The Commission considered reassigning that part lying south of Hunt Club Road and east of the Transitway to the proposed electoral district of Nepean—Carleton with a view to balancing population in those two electoral districts. In the end, the Commission declined to do so because it believes the residents of that area have a significant community of interest with and historical attachment to the residents immediately to the north.

The Commission received persuasive submissions that the community of interest of the Town of Mississippi Mills was with communities in Lanark County, and not with an electoral district more closely associated with the City of Ottawa.

The electoral district of OTTAWA—ORLÉANS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Nepean—Carleton lying east of Ramsayville Road and north of Mitch Owens Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Glengarry—Prescott—Russell lying west of Tenth Line Road, Carlsbad Lane and Frontier Road between Wall Road and Devine Road; plus that part of the current electoral district of Glengarry—Prescott—Russell lying west of Frank Kenny Road and Ted Kelly Lane to the Ottawa River and north of Wall Road; less that part lying northwest of Regional Road 174 from St. Joseph Boulevard to Blair Road, assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Vanier. It has a population of 119,247, which is 12.27% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of RIDEAU—CARLETON (formerly named Nepean—Carleton) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: plus that part of the current electoral district of Carleton—Mississippi Mills lying south of Highway 7 and Highway 417 to Huntmar Drive, south of Maple Grove Road to the Carp River, and west of the Carp River and Terry Fox Drive; less that part lying north of Brophy Drive and Bankfield Road, and west of the Rideau River, assigned to the new electoral district of Nepean; and less that part lying east of Ramsayville Road and north of Mitch Owens Road, assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. It has a population of 89,522, which is 15.71% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KANATA—CARLETON (formerly part of the electoral district of Carleton—Mississippi Mills) is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Town of Mississippi Mills, assigned to the electoral district of Lanark—Frontenac; and less that part lying south of Highway 7 and Highway 417 to Huntmar Drive, south of Maple Grove Road to the Carp River, and west of the Carp River and Terry Fox Drive, assigned to the electoral district of Rideau—Carleton. It has a population of 100,846, which is 5.05% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA WEST—NEPEAN is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along Baseline Road and Fisher Avenue. It has a population of 111,881, which is 5.34% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NEPEAN (formerly part of the electoral district of Nepean—Carleton) is bounded as follows: on the north by the southern boundary of the electoral district of Ottawa West—Nepean; on the east by the Rideau River; on the south by Brophy Drive and Bankfield Road; and on the west by Eagleson Road to Hope Side Road to Richmond Road. It has a population of 104,775, which is 1.35% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA CENTRE is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along Baseline Road and Fisher Avenue. It has a population of 113,619, which is 6.97% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA SOUTH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, slightly adjusted along the Rideau River. It has a population of 121,894, which is 14.76% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OTTAWA—VANIER is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, plus that part of the current electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans lying northwest of Regional Road 174 from St. Joseph Boulevard to Blair Road. It has a population of 110,999, which is 4.51% above the provincial quota.

Eastern Ontario Outside of Ottawa

The Commission's original treatment of the balance of Eastern Ontario was influenced by two factors: the substantial growth in population along Lake Ontario, and the existing configuration of north–south electoral districts that mixed urban and rural areas. Its Proposal attempted to realign a number of electoral districts on an east–west axis.

The Commission received substantial criticism that its approach severed communities of interest, divided and combined parts of counties, and ignored an historical attachment that runs along north–south lines despite the mixing of rural and urban areas. In particular, the Commission heard strong criticism of its proposed electoral districts of Lanark—Frontenac—Hastings, Belleville—Napanee—Frontenac and Prince Edward—Quinte West, and the effect on the current electoral district of Northumberland—Quinte West. The strongest criticism focused on the division of counties.

The first rule in the Act is population equality. Another rule is community of interest. The submissions at the hearings made it clear that the public generally gives community of interest significantly greater weight than an impersonal numerical quota. This was particularly true in Eastern Ontario, where the counties were founded as part of the creation of Upper Canada in the late 18th century. The message from the hearings in this part of the province was clear: keep communities of interest together as much as possible, and respect county boundaries as much as possible, even if that might result in significant variances from the provincial quota.

Accordingly, the Commission has decided to revise the boundaries in its Proposal for this area with a view to keeping counties as unified as possible, taking into account other historical communities of interest and respecting the population quota as much as possible within those constraints. This results in substantial changes to the boundaries for electoral districts southwest of Ottawa.

The population of the current electoral district of Kingston and the Islands is 125,227. In its Proposal, the Commission maintained the boundaries of that electoral district despite the high population. That decision was influenced by the proposed boundaries for adjoining electoral districts. As a result of persuasive objections at the public hearings to revisit those boundaries, the Commission made significant changes that require an adjustment to the electoral district of Kingston and the Islands to balance population.

The Commission is of the view that, for residents of the northwest part of the electoral district of Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke, community of interest lies with the City of Pembroke and the County of Renfrew, not with the City of North Bay or the District of Nipissing. Therefore, there is no longer any need to refer to Nipissing in the name of that electoral district.

The electoral district of GLENGARRY—PRESCOTT—RUSSELL is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less that part lying west of Frank Kenny Road and Ted Kelly Lane to the Ottawa River as well as north of Wall Road, and less that part lying west of Tenth Line Road, Carlsbad Lane, and Frontier Road between Wall Road and Devine Road, both assigned to the electoral district of Ottawa—Orléans. It has a population of 106,240, which is 0.03% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of STORMONT—DUNDAS—SOUTH GLENGARRY remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 100,913, which is 4.99% below the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of LEEDS—GRENVILLE remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 99,306, which is 6.50% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of LANARK—FRONTENAC is composed of Lanark County and Frontenac County, excluding the Township of Frontenac Islands and that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 98,409, which is 7.35% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of KINGSTON AND THE ISLANDS is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less that part of the City of Kingston lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 116,996, which is 10.15% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of HASTINGS—LENNOX AND ADDINGTON is composed of Lennox and Addington County, Hastings County, and that part of the City of Belleville lying north of Highway 401. It has a population of 92,528, which is 12.88% below the provincial quota.

The electoral district of BAY OF QUINTE is composed of the City of Quinte West, plus that part of the City of Belleville lying south of Highway 401, and plus the City of Prince Edward. It has a population of 109,488, which is 3.08% above the provincial quota.

The boundaries of the electoral district of RENFREW—PEMBROKE (formerly named Renfrew—Nipissing—Pembroke) remain unchanged from the 2003 representation order. It has a population of 102,537, which is 3.46% below the provincial quota.

Haliburton, Peterborough and Northumberland

The changes made to the Proposal for Eastern Ontario outside of Ottawa have implications for the Haliburton, Peterborough and Northumberland area. In addition, the Commission heard several criticisms of its Proposal at the public hearings. It was argued that the Cities of Prince Edward and Belleville share a significant community of interest. There was strong opposition to the Commission's division of Northumberland County; residents also opposed the removal of "Northumberland" from the name of an electoral district, since it had been one of the original 19 founding counties in Upper Canada. The Commission received advice at its public hearings on changes that would largely preserve most of the existing electoral districts without unduly affecting communities of interest.

The electoral district of HALIBURTON—KAWARTHA LAKES—BROCK is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, less the Townships of Galway-Cavendish and Harvey, and North Kawartha, assigned to the electoral district of Peterborough. It has a population of 110,182, which is 3.74% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of PETERBOROUGH is composed of the boundaries from the 2003 representation order, adjusted as follows: less the Townships of Otonabee-South Monaghan and Asphodel-Norwood, assigned to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge; plus the Townships of Galway-Cavendish and Harvey, and North Kawartha, formerly part of the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock. It has a population of 115,269, which is 8.53% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of NORTHUMBERLAND—PINE RIDGE is composed of Northumberland County, the Townships of Otonabee-South Monaghan and Asphodel-Norwood, and that part of the Municipality of Clarington lying east of Darlington-Manvers Townline, Darlington-Clarke Townline and Regional 42 Road. It has a population of 107,840, which is 1.53% above the provincial quota.

Durham Region

The Commission's decision to revise its Proposal for electoral districts in Eastern Ontario outside Ottawa, and in the Haliburton, Peterborough and Northumberland area, also affected Durham Region. There were strong requests at the public hearings to keep Durham Region and the communities within it whole. Residents of the region expressed the sentiment that community of interest was substantially more important to them than correspondence with the provincial quota. There was also criticism of the way that the Commission had divided the Municipality of Clarington among three electoral districts, combined the City of Pickering with a portion of the Town of Whitby, and drawn the boundaries in the City of Oshawa.

As a result of changes made to adjacent electoral districts to the east, the Commission has been largely successful in its endeavours to keep Durham Region whole. The exceptions were the assignment of the Township of Brock to the electoral district of Haliburton—Kawartha Lakes—Brock, and the assignment of part of the Municipality of Clarington to the electoral district of Northumberland—Pine Ridge.

The population of the balance of Durham Region is 582,132. This warrants five electoral districts, some of which have high populations. With the ripple effect of changes in Eastern Ontario, and in response to criticisms and suggestions at the public hearings, the Commission realigned those five electoral districts and renamed two of them. It was impossible to keep the Municipality of Clarington whole.

The electoral district of OSHAWA—DURHAM is composed of the following: that part of the Municipality of Clarington lying west of Regional 42 Road, Darlington-Clarke Townline, and Darlington-Manvers Townline; plus the Township of Scugog; and plus that part of the City of Oshawa lying north of Taunton Road. It has a population of 115,395, which is 8.64% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of OSHAWA is composed of that part of the City of Oshawa lying south of Taunton Road. It has a population of 125,771, which is 18.41% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of WHITBY is composed of the Town of Whitby. It has a population of 122,022, which is 14.88% above the provincial quota.

The electoral district of AJAX is composed of the Town of Ajax. It has a population of 109,600, which is 3.19% above the provincial quota.

In its Proposal, the Commission had divided the Township of Uxbridge between two electoral districts. The changes made in the rest of Durham Region permit the whole of the Township to be assigned to a single electoral district.

The electoral district of PICKERING—UXBRIDGE is composed of the City of Pickering, plus the Township of Uxbridge. It has a population of 109,344, which is 2.95% above the provincial quota.



Please note that this application does not work correctly in Internet Explorer 8. Please use a newer version of Internet Explorer or another browser such as Firefox or Chrome.